I Wish My Dog Would Listen

by | May 6, 2013

Do you know this feeling – wishing your dog would listen?

Your dog listening has little to do with your dog and more to do with you.

It is a lovely, sunny day here in Anchorage, Alaska and I am sitting at a wonderful place called the Far North Yarn Company watching the shop while the owner has a dentist appointment. I figured I’d take the time to publish a new post, but couldn’t decide on what. There’s a girl here named MK (she’s a master knitter) who has a Shiba Inu. I asked her: “if there was one thing you would want to read about to better your relationship with your dog, what would that be?”

She said, “How do I get the little (expletive removed) to listen?” MK’s question is a great question and we’re going to help you out here with some tips.

If you’re having trouble getting your dog to listen, realize that you’re not alone. MK is with you. So are a lot of other people. Believe it or not, not all of my dogs listen all of the time, every time. But they do pretty well and we have a very high obedience rate. However, our long haired German Shepherd Puppies know that they have no choice but to listen.

The key to getting your puppy to listen is consistency.

We will probably write a million blog posts about this. Being consistent with your dog is the entire key to training. As soon as your puppy realizes that he doesn’t have to listen to you and there is no consequence, you have just built yourself a hill that you are going to have to battle up. Your dog must do what you say, every time, all of the time.

An awesome trainer once drilled in to my head that dogs are self-serving. If they want to chase another dog at the park and believe that chasing that dog will be better than coming to you, they are going to do that. Dogs are also situational. While your puppy may come in the house because there is nothing more exciting going on, if you are at the beach or a dog park, it is going to be a different story.

This is why you must teach your puppy that listening is not optional.

If my mother had a dollar for every time she had to say that to me, she’d be a millionaire. But seriously, if you are going to tell your dog to come and then not make it, just stop working on training. Before you ever tell your dog to “come,” determine if you are actually going to make it come or not. Part of this is determining if you are actually in a position to do this.

This is why we recommend beginning recall training with the puppy on a leash. Go get an 8 foot leash and a 50 foot leash. When you are training your puppy to come, put it on the leash and when you say come, make him come. This reinforces the fact that when you say “come,” the end result is your puppy coming to you.

So here’s the answer to MK’s question: You don’t get your dog to listen, you make your dog listen. You are the pack leader, your dog is the minion. Your dog does not get to decide whether or not he obeys, you do! As we mention in our post about being the pack leader, your dog actually wants you to be the leader. It wants you to give out orders and obey them. Your puppy will thrive in this environment.

We are here to empower you. You can get your dog to listen every time, all of the time.
Make your puppy listen.

Here is MK’s Shiba Inu, Oliver!

That’s my answer, MK. You don’t “get” your dog to listen, you “make” your dog listen. And your real problem isn’t getting your dog to listen. Your real problem is that you have a Shiba Inu when you should have a German Shepherd…. (we’re joking of course – or maybe not!)

At Far North Kennel, we breed German Shepherd Puppies in Alaska. We don’t care if you have a German Shepherd Puppy or a Shiba Inu – we want to help you have a better relationship with your dog no matter what the breed! If you ever have any questions about dog training, behavior or getting a puppy from us, we invite you to contact us. Every email we receive gets a personalized response – just because we like you and your dog!

 




Do you know this feeling – wishing your dog would listen?

 

Your dog listening has little to do with your dog and more to do with you.

It is a lovely, sunny day here in Anchorage, Alaska and I am sitting at a wonderful place called the Far North Yarn Company watching the shop while the owner has a dentist appointment. I figured I’d take the time to publish a new post, but couldn’t decide on what. There’s a girl here named MK (she’s a master knitter) who has a Shiba Inu. I asked her: “if there was one thing you would want to read about to better your relationship with your dog, what would that be?”

She said, “How do I get the little (expletive removed) to listen?” MK’s question is a great question and we’re going to help you out here with some tips.

If you’re having trouble getting your dog to listen, realize that you’re not alone. MK is with you. So are a lot of other people. Believe it or not, not all of my dogs listen all of the time, every time. But they do pretty well and we have a very high obedience rate. However, our long haired German Shepherd Puppies know that they have no choice but to listen.

The key to getting your puppy to listen is consistency.

We will probably write a million blog posts about this. Being consistent with your dog is the entire key to training. As soon as your puppy realizes that he doesn’t have to listen to you and there is no consequence, you have just built yourself a hill that you are going to have to battle up. Your dog must do what you say, every time, all of the time.

An awesome trainer once drilled in to my head that dogs are self-serving. If they want to chase another dog at the park and believe that chasing that dog will be better than coming to you, they are going to do that. Dogs are also situational. While your puppy may come in the house because there is nothing more exciting going on, if you are at the beach or a dog park, it is going to be a different story.

This is why you must teach your puppy that listening is not optional.

If my mother had a dollar for every time she had to say that to me, she’d be a millionaire. But seriously, if you are going to tell your dog to come and then not make it, just stop working on training. Before you ever tell your dog to “come,” determine if you are actually going to make it come or not. Part of this is determining if you are actually in a position to do this.

This is why we recommend beginning recall training with the puppy on a leash. Go get an 8 foot leash and a 50 foot leash. When you are training your puppy to come, put it on the leash and when you say come, make him come. This reinforces the fact that when you say “come,” the end result is your puppy coming to you.

So here’s the answer to MK’s question: You don’t get your dog to listen, you make your dog listen. You are the pack leader, your dog is the minion. Your dog does not get to decide whether or not he obeys, you do! As we mention in our post about being the pack leader, your dog actually wants you to be the leader. It wants you to give out orders and obey them. Your puppy will thrive in this environment.

We are here to empower you. You can get your dog to listen every time, all of the time.

 

Make your puppy listen.

Here is MK’s Shiba Inu, Oliver!

That’s my answer, MK. You don’t “get” your dog to listen, you “make” your dog listen. And your real problem isn’t getting your dog to listen. Your real problem is that you have a Shiba Inu when you should have a German Shepherd…. (we’re joking of course – or maybe not!)

At Far North Kennel, we breed German Shepherd Puppies in Alaska. We don’t care if you have a German Shepherd Puppy or a Shiba Inu – we want to help you have a better relationship with your dog no matter what the breed! If you ever have any questions about dog training, behavior or getting a puppy from us, we invite you to contact us. Every email we receive gets a personalized response – just because we like you and your dog!

 

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